My Life in Chiropractic

By Dr. Michael Roth

 

Hello! My name is Michael Roth and I am a holistic chiropractor licensed to practice in the states of California and Hawaii.  After I graduated from the Los Angeles Chiropractor College in 1984, I joined a well-established practice here in Ventura, California.  I wore a white jacket and applied hot compresses to my patients’ sore spots before I manually adjusted their backs and necks.

Dr. Roth cropped

If needed, I attached wires to their skin to administer tiny electric shocks to help release tight muscles.  I would have several patients in different rooms at the same time, running back and forth in an attempt to meet everyone’s needs at once.  Often, I saw the same people three times a week, week after week, with the hope of eventually relieving their pain.

 

I learned that this very traditional form of chiropractic was not for me. I was frustrated with the low rate of complete healing that my patients were experiencing, despite repeated office visits.  I started to look at other healing modalities that I could add to my “menu” of wellness practices.

 

The first alternative modality I learned is called Neuro Emotional Technique. What makes NET unique is its focus on releasing patients’ emotional blocks stored in the body’s memory through simple chiropractic adjustments. It also relies on aspects as unusual as a five-element acupuncture model, acupressure points, and homeopathic combination remedies.

Dr. Roth NETThis technique started to give my patients the complete healing for which I was looking!  As I connected the dots in each individual’s healing process, I became more and more convinced of the importance their thoughts, beliefs and emotions had in their healing process. I was excited and wanted to learn more!  Now I also utilize CRA, QNRT, and NMT in the evaluation and healing of my patients.  (Visit  www.RothWellnessCenter.com  for more information on these techniques.)

 

Triad of health book coverIn the past 25 years, I have dedicated myself to balancing each patient’s individual Triad of Health.  When the structural, chemical and emotional systems of the body are in sync, the body’s natural ability to heal itself is able to come forth and manifest wellness.   Healing the patient who has been suffering from chronic pain is one of my biggest joys!

 

I have witnessed incredible transformations in only a few sessions and I absolutely know I am in the right place at the right time and doing what I was put on this planet to accomplish! The mind-body connection is my specialty and my work continues to excite me to this day, 29 years after getting my Doctor of Chiropractic degree.

 

Please feel free to share my story with your friends and relatives and refer them to Crystal in my Ventura office to set up a free consultation. 805-644-0461. I want to make a difference in the health of the world, and it starts right here, right now!

Dr. Roth treatment

 

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Your Gut Response

By Dr. Michael Roth

At one time or another, most of us have felt our stomach talking to us. Perhaps we overate, or ate something that didn’t agree with us. Maybe we are stressed by our thoughts or our circumstances, or can’t “stomach” what is going on in our lives and it is affecting our health.

The fact is that most of us will suffer from one digestive disorder or another at some time in our lives. The highest number of calls received by the National Health Service is from people suffering with digestive problems. Our diet and the foods we eat play a major role in keeping our digestive system in good order. This month, I’d like to discuss three common digestive problems that I see in patients in my holistic chiropractic practice: heartburn, indigestion and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

 

Heartburn

First of all, heartburn has nothing to do with the heart itself. Rather, it is a term used to describe the burning sensation that occurs in the chest area, just behind the breastbone. Heartburn pain is often worse when lying down or bending over.

It may be accompanied by other symptoms including: regurgitation, a bitter taste at the back of the mouth or throat, excess salivation, belching, and difficulty or pain when swallowing. There is often a feeling of “fullness” after eating, feeling sick and/or vomiting. Heartburn can develop at any time and may not always be as a result of eating or drinking. Stress is also a common cause of heartburn.

Heartburn occurs when stomach acid backs up into your esophagus. Normally when you swallow, your lower esophageal sphincter — a circular band of muscle around the bottom part of your esophagus — relaxes to allow food and liquid to flow down into your stomach. Then it closes again.

However, if the lower esophageal sphincter relaxes abnormally or weakens, stomach acid can flow back up into your esophagus, causing heartburn. The acid backup may be worse when you’re bent over or lying down.

Flickr photo credit evindc

The advice for sufferers is to eat slowly and in a relaxed environment, concentrate on enjoying your food and chew it thoroughly. Do not drink too much while eating. Sip fennel, mint, chamomile or apple tea.

Foods to avoid include crisps, chips, nuts and rich creamy or fried foods; acidic foods like vinegar and pickles; citrus fruits or unripe fruit can cause acid reflex. Smoking can also cause heartburn—another reason to quit!

 

Indigestion

Indigestion, also known as dyspepsia, is a term used to describe one or more symptoms including a feeling of fullness during a meal, uncomfortable fullness after a meal, and burning or pain in the upper abdomen. Sometimes the term indigestion is used to describe the symptoms of heartburn, but these are two different conditions. A person can have symptoms of both indigestion and heartburn.

Indigestion can be caused by a condition in the digestive tract such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), peptic ulcer disease, cancer, or abnormality of the pancreas or bile ducts. If the condition improves or resolves, the symptoms of indigestion usually improve.

Sometimes, however, a person has indigestion for which  a cause cannot be found. This type of indigestion, called  functional dyspepsia, is thought to occur in the area where  the stomach meets the small intestine. The indigestion  may be related to abnormal motility—the squeezing or  relaxing action—of the stomach muscle as it receives, digests, and moves food into the small intestine.

Most people with indigestion experience more than one of the following symptoms:

Fullness during a meal. The person feels overly full soon after the   meal starts and cannot finish the meal.

Bothersome fullness after a meal. The person feels overly full after a meal—it may feel like the food is staying in the stomach too long.

Epigastric pain. The epigastric area is between the lower end of the chest bone and the navel. The person may experience epigastric pain ranging from mild to severe.

Epigastric burning. The person feels an unpleasant sensation of heat in the epigastric area.

 

Some people may experience relief from symptoms of indigestion by eating several small, low-fat meals throughout the day at a slow pace, refraining from smoking, abstaining from consuming coffee, carbonated beverages and alcohol, stopping use of medications that may irritate the stomach lining such as aspirin or anti-inflammatory drugs, getting enough rest, and finding ways to decrease emotional and physical stress, such as relaxation therapy or exercise.

 

Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

IBS affects a third of the population at some time or another and about one in ten people suffer symptoms bad enough to go to the doctor. It can be painful and distressing, and a qualified medical practitioner should confirm diagnosis of IBS.

Symptoms include abdominal pain or a sharp pain felt low down inside the rectum, spasm/diarrhea and bloated stomach, rumbling noises and wind, constipation, nausea, belching and vomiting. Stress is believed to play a significant part in the occurrence of IBS.

Despite current awareness of IBS and its effect on the quality of life, a cure has yet to be found. Some people find their IBS is due to food intolerance. Foods to avoid are wheat products, cereals, pastries and pasta and sauces made with flour. Cut down on diary intake – milk, cheese, butter, yogurt and custard.

It is best to keep food as light as possible – try milk substitutes such as organic soy or rice milk. IBS is sometimes aggravated by particularly fatty and rich foods like fried or creamy dishes.

 

Stress

The common denominator found in all three of these conditions is STRESS!  Mental, emotional and physical stress often shows up as dis-ease in our body. Our “gut response” is a communication from our body that something needs to change.

I have found QNRT (Quantum Neurological Reset Therapy) to be an excellent program to remove the emotional stressors that prevent the body from functioning at its best. QNRT is a great complimentary therapy designed to aid with any other treatment you are now seeking to find relief from disease, behavioral issues, relationship challenges and addictions.

Flickr photo credit Celestine Chua

If your gut has been talking to you and you don’t know what it is saying or asking, please call Amber in our Ventura office at 805-644-0461 and make an appointment for an office visit with me. Don’t let the symptoms of heartburn, indigestion or IBS rule your body and your life. You CAN take charge of your health and wellbeing!

Recovering From the Loss of a Beloved Animal

By Dr. Michael Roth

 

A great many of us enjoy having pets as  companions. We cherish them, pamper them, and play with them. In return, a pet, whether it is a dog, a cat, or a guinea pig, provides us with a sense of comfort, companionship and even unconditional love.

Flickr photo credit Amanda Nichols

The fact is most pets will not outlive their masters. Losing a pet can be devastating. The feelings a pet owner faces are similar to feelings experienced when losing a family member: sadness, denial, anger, guilt, and depression.

What can you do to move through the feelings of loss? Here are some ideas.

First, do not deny the feelings. They are very real to you and it does not help to keep them bottled up inside. If you feel like crying, then cry. That is nothing to be ashamed of. You have just lost a best friend.

Second, do not let others trivialize your feelings. Sometimes it is best to be by yourself for a while to give yourself time to let your feelings out.

On the other hand, often you may feel the need to express your feelings to someone who understands. It is quite likely that you know someone who has already lost a pet and would understand. Seek them out and ask if they will meet with you.

When we don’t express our feelings, they can become stuck in our bodies in unexpected ways. Occasionally in my practice, a patient comes to me with symptoms of ill health that turn out to have their origin in the loss of a pet.

For example, a patient with watery eyes and excessive sneezing thought she had allergies. One session of QNRT (Quantum Neurological Reset Technique) identified the recent loss of her dog as the underlying cause of her symptoms, which disappeared completely by the end of her session.

Finally, prepare a place of remembrance for your pet. It may not always be possible to bury your pet in your yard, but you can create a memorial by burying some of your pet’s belongings, such as a food dish, collar, or some of its favorite toys and placing a small marker at the site. Much like a funeral, this is often one of the best ways to bring closure.

Do not be in a big hurry to replace your pet. Give yourself some time to grieve. Give yourself a few weeks before deciding to get another pet.

Flickr photo credit hto2008

If you or someone you know are having a challenge moving beyond the death of a pet, or have recently lost a pet and are having unexplained symptoms of ill health, please call my office for an appointment – 805-644-0461.


Published in: on September 7, 2011 at 10:15 pm  Leave a Comment  
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Parasympathetic Nervous System Dominance

By Dr. Michael Roth

In my last post we discussed the Sympathetic Nervous System, and the way it affects the body.  This time, we are going to explore the other part of our nervous system, the Parasympathetic, and discuss the interaction between the two.

Your body is more than blood and bones and muscle.  It is an elegant system that also includes glands and organs and is designed to work with perfect circulation, perfect assimilation and perfect elimination.  Yet, I see patients daily for whom this “perfection” is only a pipe-dream.  Sometimes, the culprit that is responsible for a body that is not functioning properly is the nervous system.

Flickr photo credit Laura Dahl

The parasympathetic nervous system works to nourish, heal and regenerate the body.  It is anabolic, which means it is concerned with rebuilding the body.  Its nerves stimulate digestion, and the immune and eliminative organs.  These organs include the liver, pancreas, stomach and intestines.  The parasympathetic nervous system, when activated by rest, relaxation and happy thoughts, is essential for balanced living and for all healing.

The sympathetic nervous system activates the glands and organs that defend the body against attack.  It is called the fight-or-flight system.  Its nerves direct more blood to the muscles and the brain.

The heart rate and blood pressure increase, while it decreases the blood flow to the digestive and eliminative organs.  It also activates the thyroid and adrenal glands to provide extra energy for fighting or running away.  Nervousness, stress or feelings of panic are what one feels when in a sympathetic state of readiness.  The sympathetic system is catabolic, which means it tears down the body.  Energy is used to prepare for defense, rather than for nourishment or for elimination of wastes.

Flickr photo credit Nate Steiner

Flickr photo credit Nate Steiner

 

The feeling often associated with the parasympathetic state can be one of lethargy or fatigue, as one is so relaxed.  This is not unhealthy.  Rather, it indicates a state of repair and rebuilding in progress.

Symptoms of parasympathetic nervous system dominance often include feeling depressed and cynical.  An individual may be paralyzed by their fear or anger about their situation.  There may be a decrease in clarity of thought as a part of a numbing process to avoid pain and overwhelming emotions.

When a patient arrives at my office in parasympathetic dominance, I often see a person who tends to be more fatigued and prone to depression and whose adrenal and thyroid glands tend to be underactive. They may experience multiple allergies. Other symptoms include weight gain, dizziness and light headedness, low blood pressure and diarrhea.

Many of my patients have already gone from doctor to doctor looking for a cure before they come to my office.  In my many years as a holistic chiropractor, I have studied and practiced effective procedures and techniques, along with nutritional supplements, that balance the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems.

When the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems are working as they should, the tendency is to rest often and easily. The parasympathetic system reduces the activity of the brain, the muscles, and the adrenal and thyroid glands.  When no situation is pressing, the balanced person can comfortably choose to rest and can sleep deeply. In this restorative sleep, the parasympathetic system renews and heals any damage to the body caused by an over-active sympathetic nervous system.  Balance between the two systems is a key step toward greater health and wellness!

Flickr photo credit der wunderbare mandarin

Sympathetic Nervous System Dominance

If we were in the forest camping, and came upon a grizzly bear and its cub, we would have an instant to decide if we would stay and fight the bear, or run away from it as fast as we could!

Modern man has named that choice to react “fight-or-flight”, a term that is often used when talking about the human stress response. Though we no longer face bears on a regular basis, when we react to a car alarm with the same heightened response we would to a dangerous animal, we are stuck in the fight-or-flight mode!  Over my 25 years as a holistic chiropractor, I have treated many patients stuck in this pattern, and they have successfully released it and re-balanced their nervous system.

The human nervous system has two major divisions, the voluntary and the autonomic systems.  The voluntary system is concerned mainly with movement and sensation.  It consists of motor and sensory nerves, among many others.

The autonomic system mainly controls functions over which we have less conscious control.  These include the digestion of food, blood pressure and heart rate.  Its nerves leave the spine and connect to all the major organs and glands, either inhibiting or stimulating their activity.

The autonomic nervous system maintains a balance by regulating the internal organs, blood vessels, and hormones.  It is divided into the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems.  The sympathetic is active, controlling functions that include those associated with fight-or-flight.  The parasympathetic is passive, controlling the functions of rest and repair.

Flickr photo credit der wunderbare mandarin

Flickr photo credit der wunderbare mandarin

When we are in fight-or-flight mode, the sympathetic branch activates the glands and organs that defend the body against attack.   Its nerves direct more blood to the muscles and the brain.  The heart rate and blood pressure increase, while it decreases the blood flow to the digestive and eliminative organs.  It also activates the thyroid and adrenal glands to provide extra energy for fighting or running away.  Nervousness, stress or feelings of panic are what we feel when in a sympathetic state of readiness.

A constantly active sympathetic nervous system results in sympathetic dominance and puts the individual at risk for increased disease and illness. What drives a person into sympathetic dominance?  Chronic stress and overwork are the most common culprits.

The symptoms and illnesses associated with sympathetic nervous system dominance are those of fight-or-flight, and include: excessive worry, the inability to relax, nervous energy, and a strong self-will to “keep going.” Often my patients experience a dry mouth and sensitivity to bright lights and find loud music extremely irritating. Possible illnesses include: hypertension, heart disease, high cholesterol, type 1 diabetes, anxiety, panic attacks and poor sleep.

Flickr photo credit Bottled Void

If you recognize yourself having any of the above symptoms, know that there is a way to remove yourself from the fight-or-flight pattern.  I am experienced in cutting-edge techniques and protocols, and offer nutritional supplements as needed, to relieve your nervous system of the underlying stressors that are hindering it from functioning optimally.

When the sympathetic dominance pattern is broken, and balance is restored between the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems, the body’s innate knowing rushes in to restore the individual to an improved level of health and wellness!

Find out more about how your nervous system affects your health and your weight  here.

Powerful Technique to Control Stress!

By Dr. Michael Roth

I have been a holistic chiropractor for over 25 years now, helping people manage pain, stress levels, weight levels, and addictions.  I would like to share with you a very powerful, yet simple technique that can instantly “reboot” your system when you are experiencing stress.  Please watch the video below and try the technique.  Then, please leave me some feedback as to how this technique has helped you or someone you love manage stress!

 

Feeding Your Feelings

Eating to feed a feeling, and not a growling stomach, is emotional eating.

Food does more than fill your stomach — it also satisfies feelings, and when you quench those feelings with food when your stomach isn’t growling, that’s emotional eating.

Flickr photo credit photo and share cc

Emotional eating is eating for reasons other than hunger. Instead of the physical symptom of hunger initiating the eating, an emotion triggers the eating.

How to Tell the Difference

There are several differences between emotional hunger and physical hunger, according to the University of Texas Counseling and Mental Health Center web site:

1. Emotional hunger comes on suddenly; physical hunger occurs gradually.

2. When you are eating to fill a void that isn’t related to an empty stomach, you crave a specific food, such as pizza or ice cream, and only that food will meet your need. When you eat because you are actually hungry, you’re open to options.

3. Emotional hunger feels like it needs to be satisfied instantly with the food you crave; physical hunger can wait.

4. Even when you are full, if you’re eating to satisfy an emotional need, you’re more likely to keep eating. When you’re eating because you’re hungry, you’re more likely to stop when you’re full.

5. Emotional eating can leave behind feelings of guilt; eating when you are physically hungry does not.

The first thing you need to do to overcome emotional eating is to recognize it.

Emotional hurts that occurred in your early childhood may be the root of your emotional eating today.   Yet, it is not always easy to recognize those hurts in yourself.  You may not have a clear memory of when or why or what caused the negative belief about yourself that results in your emotional eating. You may only be aware that every time you talk to your mother on the phone, you need to have a bowl of ice cream afterward.  Or that a disagreement with your spouse sends you heading for the potato chips.

The Emotional Weight Loss™ system calls these emotional hurts “negative core drivers.” Examples of negative core drivers are: rejection, powerlessness, vulnerability, feeling unlovable or defective, or feeling emotionally deprived.

Negative core drivers and beliefs about our self are not accurate or reliable – they are just plain false!  The problem is that our nervous system doesn’t believe it and acts accordingly, making the choices that support those false beliefs!

The key is to reset the brain to lose weight and keep the weight off!

The Emotional Weight Loss™ system uses QNRT, Quantum Neurological Reset Therapy, to make these shifts. QNRT is a system of healing that happens from within and recognizes and restores the connection of the brain, the body, and nervous system to remove the blockages so that the body can heal itself.

QNRT combines a unique biofeedback technology with a nervous system relay therapy to neurologically reprogram the brain/relay access points – the places where our body’s neurological and emotional programs reside. Simply put, the QNRT process actually “re-wires” the nervous system.

QNRT is non-invasive, requires no prescription, no manipulation, no physiotherapy and no extensive talk therapy.

Dr. Michael Roth is a certified practitioner of QNRT and The Emotional Weight Loss™ system.  For more information, go to www.qnrt.com and www.rothwellnesscenter.com. To schedule an appointment, contact drmroth@sbcglobal.net or call 805-644-0461.

Comfort Food

Ah, the comfort of eating mashed potatoes, fried chicken, white bread, ice cream, potato chips, crackers, chocolate chip cookies, etc.  In times of stress, when we are feeling “down in the dumps”, lonely, or misunderstood, comfort food is what we turn to in order to feel better about ourselves or a situation.

Flickr photo credit Miguel Discart

Emotional eating is the practice of consuming large quantities of food — usually “comfort” or junk foods — in response to feelings instead of hunger. Experts estimate that 75% of overeating is caused by emotions.

Many of us learn that food can bring comfort, at least in the short-term. As a result, we often turn to food to heal emotional problems.

Situations and emotions that trigger us to eat fall into five main categories.

  • Social. Eating when around other people. For example, excessive eating can result from being encouraged by others to eat; eating to fit in; arguing; or feelings of inadequacy around other people.
  • Emotional. Eating in response to boredom, stress, fatigue, tension, depression, anger, anxiety or loneliness as a way to “fill the void.”
  • Situational. Eating because the opportunity is there. For example, at a restaurant, seeing an advertisement for a particular food, passing by a bakery. Eating may also be associated with certain activities such as watching TV, going to the movies or a sporting event, etc.
  • Thoughts. Eating as a result of negative self-worth or making excuses for eating. For example, scolding oneself for looks or a lack of will power.
  • Physiological. Eating in response to physical cues. For example, increased hunger due to skipping meals or eating to cure headaches or other pain.

How Do I Break Myself of the Habit?

Identifying eating triggers is the first step; however, this alone is not sufficient to alter eating behavior. Usually, by the time you have identified a pattern, eating in response to emotions or certain situations has become a habit. Now you have to break that habit. Yet, simply distracting yourself from eating and developing alternative habits is not enough to manage the emotional distress that leads to excessive eating.

Flickr photo credit lee Carson

Flickr photo credit lee Carson

Emotional hurts that occurred in your early childhood, that you may not even consciously remember, are responsible for your eating habits today.  Your brain has been wired to react as a child and even now, as an adult, you impulsively eat not as a person of choice, but because emotionally you are stuck at your earliest emotional wounds.

The key is to reset the brain to lose weight and keep the weight off!

 

A quantum shift can occur in our behaviors by resetting the brain from those pre-programmed emotional stresses. We do not have to remain a victim to our own nervous system. We can forgive, resolve, and let go of the emotional stresses contributing to dysfunction in our bodies.

The Emotional Weight Loss™ system uses QNRT, Quantum Neurological Reset Therapy, to make these shifts. QNRT is a system of healing that happens from within and recognizes and restores the connection of the brain, the body, and nervous system to remove the blockages so that the body can heal itself.

QNRT combines a unique biofeedback technology with a nervous system relay therapy to neurologically reprogram the brain/relay access points – the places where our body’s neurological and emotional programs reside. Simply put, the QNRT process actually “re-wires” the nervous system.

QNRT is non-invasive, requires no prescription, no manipulation, no physiotherapy and no extensive talk therapy.

Dr. Michael Roth is a certified practitioner of QNRT and The Emotional Weight Loss™ system.  For more information, go to www.qnrt.com and www.rothwellnesscenter.com. To schedule an appointment, contact drmroth@sbcglobal.net or call 805-644-0461.

New Treatment for Weight Loss that Targets the Brain Instead of the Belly!

By Dr. Michael Roth

As a generation and as a nation we are gaining weight, growing tired, and sleeping less. Diabetes, obesity, heart disease and cancer are all on the rise.  Trends in medicine show that the “baby boomers” – those born between 1946 and 1964—are being haunted by the ominous shadows of increased weight and chronic illness as they reach age 50 and beyond.

There has been an alarming rise in obesity and heart disease in the United States in the last 20 years:

  • Two-thirds of America’s adults are overweight or obese.
  • As many as 30% of U.S. children are overweight.
  • Childhood obesity has more than doubled within the past 25 years.
  • Within the past 20 years, childhood diabetes has increased ten-fold.

We’ve been told over and over that to lose weight, we must eat healthy food and exercise.  Which foods, how much food, when and how to exercise—these parameters vary from person to person and are influenced by the popular diet plan of the moment.  Yet, many of us find ourselves in the repetitive pattern of losing weight and gaining it back.

We may be aware of when and why we overeat or choose to indulge in sweet or salty snacks.  We may know that we eat when we are angry, when our feelings are hurt, when we are bored, when we are happy, to reward ourselves for an achievement, or to console ourselves when we are feeling low.

These are examples of emotional eating. Yet despite all this diet information and self-knowledge, we find ourselves still overweight and struggling to change our eating habits.

Unresolved emotional stresses will shut down the brain, causing weight gain!

The body responds to emotional stress the same way it does to a physical or structural stressor. The brain stimulates the adrenal glands to release a hormone called cortisol, which acts on the liver to break down glycogen into sugar for “fight-or-flight” which in turn triggers the release of insulin.

The insulin brings the sugar into play for action, and if none is needed by the muscles, the sugar goes back to the liver. If not needed there because the liver has reached its maximum capacity for it, it goes to fat storage. High levels of cortisol cause the body to store fat.

The result of sustained high cortisol causes the three primary neurotransmitters to lower in the brain, contributing to weight gain, depression, and fatigue. These are the three most common complaints of all healthcare office visits in North America!

Three primary neurotransmitters typically depleted in weight gain:

  • Serotonin: Depleted levels cause craving of carbohydrates, especially sugars. Low serotonin levels are also associated with depression. Normal levels feel grounded and satisfied.
  • Epinephrine: Depleted levels do not allow the body to burn fat properly. Normal levels allow the body to burn fat effectively, and provide plenty of energy.
  • Nor-epinephrine: Lowered levels are associated with lack of motivation and normal metabolism.  Normal levels have plenty of motivation and drive.

The target area in the brain for successful weight loss is the hypothalamus. The hypothalamus controls the feeling of full and it also controls the stimulation to eat.

Flickr photo credit Laura Dahl

Emotional hurts that occurred in our early childhood, that we may not even consciously remember, are responsible for our eating habits today.  We have been wired to react as a child and even now as adults, we impulsively eat not as a person of choice, but because emotionally, we are stuck at our earliest emotional wound.

The Emotional Weight Loss™ system calls these wounds “negative core drivers.”

Examples of negative core drivers are:

  • Rejection
  • Powerlessness
  • Vulnerability
  • Feelings of Being Unlovable
  • Feelings of Being Defective
  • Emotional Deprivation

Negative core drivers and beliefs about ourselves are not accurate or reliable – they are just plain false!  The problem is that our nervous system doesn’t believe it and acts accordingly, making the choices that support those false beliefs!

A Recipe for Weight Gain:

  • Anger/struggle growing up will raise blood sugar and insulin causing fat storage.
  • Emotional stresses, fear, anxiety, and anger will raise cortisol levels for fat storage.
  • Poor diet habits rise insulin causing fat storage.

The key is to reset the brain to lose weight and keep the weight off!

A quantum shift can occur in our behaviors by resetting the brain from those pre-programmed emotional stresses. We do not have to remain a victim to our own nervous system. We can forgive, resolve, and let go of the emotional stresses contributing to dysfunction in our bodies.

True Health is not about what you are eating. It is about what is eating you!

The Emotional Weight Loss™ system uses QNRT, Quantum Neurological Reset Therapy, to make these shifts. QNRT is a system of healing that happens from within and recognizes and restores the connection of the brain, the body, and nervous system to remove the blockages so that the body can heal itself.

QNRT combines a unique biofeedback technology with a nervous system relay therapy to neurologically reprogram the brain/relay access points – the places where our body’s neurological and emotional programs reside. Simply put, the QNRT process actually “re-wires” the nervous system.

QNRT is non-invasive, requires no prescription, no manipulation, no physiotherapy and no extensive talk therapy.

Dr. Michael Roth is a certified practitioner of QNRT and The Emotional Weight Loss™ system.  For more information, go to www.qnrt.com and www.rothwellnesscenter.com. To schedule an appointment, contact drmroth@sbcglobal.net or call 805-644-0461.

 

I am now Certified in Quantum Neurological Reset Therapy!

On November 1, 2009, I became one of the first ten doctors in the United States to be certified in Quantum Neurological Reset Therapy!  I have been using QNRT in my practice over the past year as I have been training in the therapy process and have seen outstanding results with my patients. As a holistic chiropractor, I have seen how unresolved emotional issues compromise my patients’ health and well being. Over the years, I have learned many techniques that address and release those issues and I can honestly say that QNRT is a giant leap forward in identifying and permanently releasing emotional traumas stuck in the body of which the patient may not even be aware!

QNRT is a non-invasive technique that is painless, simple, and extremely effective. The evaluation process connects the subconscious to the conscious, allowing me to get to the origin of the patient’s conflict, what year it started, how it was first programmed into the patient’s nervous system and the health or behavioral problems that have manifested as a result of running this program. Then, I use a nervous system tapping technique to neurologically reprogram the brain/relay access points.

The brain and the nervous system have incredible control over every aspect of our personal lives. They regulate the production of hormones, energy level, the quality of sleep, even the level of happiness one experiences!  As I have integrated QNRT into my practice, my patients are experiencing a greater sense of well-being as they have eliminated pain, stress and tension, and old patterns of emotional response; they have more energy, vitality and a general up-leveling of their quality of life!