A Holistic Chiropractor Takes a Look at Sugar…and YOU!

By Dr. Michael Roth

 

“Sugar in the morning, sugar in the evening, sugar at suppertime…” 

The lyrics of this song from a bygone era address the sweetness of love. However, in today’s modern world, the sugar we consume at meals is very real and very addictive!

Flickr photo credit Moyan Brenn

 

Most people are not aware that they are addicted to sugar. Yet, try to go a few days without it and you will briefly experience the pangs of withdrawal. Most of the clients I see in my holistic chiropractic practice know that too much sugar is not good for their bodies and their health.

 

Sugar leads to excess weight gain and puts you on the path to Type II diabetes. Although you most likely won’t be able to eliminate sugar from your diet completely, I offer here a few tips to reduce your sugar intake.

 

Plenty of people eat sugary foods throughout the day because their bodies tell them that they are hungry. One of the best ways to combat this feeling is to drink plenty of water. In addition to staying hydrated, you will not feel as hungry.

 

 

It is very common for people to eat all sorts of foods without bothering to read the list of ingredients. If you are trying to overcome your addiction to sugar, then make label-reading a habit. If sugar is one of the first three ingredients, don’t buy it.

 

The type of food that you eat is very important. Eat foods that are as close to their original form as possible. For example, instead of eating canned peaches in syrup, eat a whole fresh peach. Eat organic oatmeal for breakfast instead of packaged cereal, which usually has added sugar.

 

In my book, The Healing Code of Weight Loss, I recommend the following:

 

Avoid large beverages such as “super-sized” sugar-sweetened soft drinks. They have a large number of calories. Instead, try drinking water with a slice of lemon. If you want to drink soda, choose a calorie-free beverage or fruit juices instead.

 

Eat a breakfast that contains protein and fat to keep sugars low. This will help stave off cravings for chocolate and starches. Protein takes longer than sugar for your body to digest. You will feel full for a longer period of time and be less inclined to reach out for a sweet snack.

 

Stay away from fast food. The high sugar and fat content of fast food, combined with lack of exercise, creates a chain of events that puts the body into chemical stress. The digestive system is down-regulated when the body is under stress and one of the symptoms is belly fat.

 

Keep an accurate journal of everything that you eat. You may be surprised at how your sugar intake adds up when all of the foods you eat are combined. Keeping a journal will allow you to see exactly how much you consume.

 

You will also help yourself by staying as active as possible. People tend to eat more often when they are sitting around relaxing or watching TV. Starting an exercise regimen is a great idea since it helps you get or stay in shape. In addition, when you are physically active, you will be too busy to reach for the sugary foods!

Flickr photo credit Brett Lohmeyer

 

If you are concerned about your sugar intake and overall health, and if you would like assistance in developing healthier eating habits and lifestyle choices, please call Amber in my Ventura office to make an appointment for a personal consultation and start singing a different tune! (805) 644-0461

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Weight Loss and Diabetes

By Dr. Michael Roth

This month, I’d like to address a health challenge that I am seeing more often in my practice: the client who is overweight and has insulin dependent diabetes.

 

“No matter how heavy you are, you will significantly lower your blood sugar if you lose some weight,” says Cathy Nonas, MS, RD, a spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Association and a professor at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City. “We know it’s true — that if someone with diabetes loses 5% to 10% of their weight, they will significantly reduce their blood sugar. We see it all the time: people can get off their insulin and their medication,” she says. “It’s wonderful. It shows you how interwoven obesity and diabetes are.”

 

Even losing 10 or 15 pounds has health benefits, says the American Diabetes Association. It can:

  • Lower blood sugar
  • Reduce blood pressure
  • Improve cholesterol levels
  • Lighten the stress on hips, knees, ankles, and feet

Plus, you’ll probably have more energy, get around easier, and breathe easier.

 

We often assume weight loss is good and healthy. A slow steady intentional weight loss using nutritional change and exercise is associated with beneficial effects on the heart, blood pressure, and cholesterol levels. In addition, for a person with insulin dependent diabetes, weight loss can reduce “insulin resistance” and make muscles and fat tissues more sensitive to circulating insulin levels in the blood.  Furthermore, insulin is a hormone that likes to store fat!

 

A reduction in insulin resistance is important because insulin is needed to help glucose (a sugar) enter these tissues to be metabolized. If these tissues are resistant to insulin, higher than normal levels of insulin are needed for this process to occur. As a result, a vicious cycle occurs: the higher the insulin levels are, the harder it is to lose weight; the heavier a person is, the more likely they are to have higher insulin levels. As you can see, the cycle is often hard to break.

Flickr photo credit Fatcatanna

Flickr photo credit Fatcatanna

 

On a Diabetes Weight Loss Plan, Watch for Changes in Blood Sugar

 

Cutting back on just one meal can affect the delicate balance of blood sugar, insulin, and medication in your body. So it’s important to work with an expert when you diet. “For anyone, losing weight is challenging enough,” says Dr. Luigi Meneghini, director of the Kosnow Diabetes Treatment Center at the University of Miami School of Medicine. “For people who inject insulin, it’s even more difficult because they have to eat when they have low blood sugar. When you have to reduce calorie intake, prevent overmedication, and eat to correct your low blood sugar, it’s very challenging.” Indeed, both low and high blood sugar levels are the two big concerns for people with diabetes.

 

If you have insulin dependent diabetes, and want to improve your health and lose weight, I want to work with you! QNRT (Quantum Neurological Reset Technique) is the modality I most often use with my clients who want to make positive changes in their health and wellness. As a team, we will work together to identify and neutralize key emotional issues that often accompany weight gain, such as anger, disgust and even struggle!

 

I will work with you to balance your blood sugar with diet and nutritional supplements.  As a knowledgeable practitioner and holistic chiropractor, I bring over 20 years of service meeting my patients’ health challenges and fostering their well-being. If you or someone you know has insulin dependent diabetes, please call for an appointment at Roth Wellness Center, 805-644-0461.

Flickr photo credit Giuseppe Milo